Kings Hill School Primary & Nursery

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Relationship, sex and health (RSHE) Education

 At Kings Hill School we acknowledge the importance of Relationship, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) in the curriculum as an important element in preparing our pupils for the transition in to adult life. As a school, we are using the Jigsaw PSHE programme to teach the statutory RSHE. 

To find out more about how the Jigsaw programme approaches RSHE, please read the parent leaflet below. 

RSHE Jigsaw Guide for Parents

For further information on our whole school approach to teaching PSHE and RSE, please refer to out policies below. 

Kings Hill School PSHE policy

Kings Hill School RSE policy 

Health and Relationship Education

From September 2020, Relationship and Health Education was made compulsory in all primary schools. The content covered is as follows:

Health Education now includes learning about ‘the changing adolescent body’ to equip children to understand puberty. This is a compulsory section of the curriculum and all children will be taught this.

Sex Education

As sex education is taught within our PSHE curriculum, parents do have the right to request their child is withdrawn from these specific lessons. We have agreed at school that sex education means human reproduction.

We believe that knowledge empowers and protects children as long as it is age-appropriate. At secondary school Sex Education is statutory and we believe that primary schools should prepare children with accurate knowledge about puberty and human reproduction before they transfer to secondary school.

Correct terminology for body parts is introduced early to normalise this biological vocabulary and to support safeguarding. These words are not used in isolation but always in conjunction, ensuring children know these are private parts of their bodies.

Puberty is introduced gently in Year 3 because some girls may start their periods this early and it is necessary to prepare them for this, so they aren’t scared or worried.

Conception is introduced age-appropriately in Year 4 in the context of understanding why our bodies change during puberty.

Understanding of human reproduction, conception and puberty is built upon in Year 5 and then puberty, conception and childbirth is age-appropriately covered in Year 6.

The grids above show a brief summary of the units within Jigsaw relating to puberty and human reproduction. As stated before, the puberty work in Jigsaw fulfils the requirements that sit under the ‘Changing Adolescent Body’ strand of statutory Health Education, and parents cannot withdraw their children from this. The sections in red highlight the sex education units and parents can withdraw their children from these. 

For more detailed information on our approach to teaching sex education in each year group please see the lesson break down below

Year 1

 Year 2

 Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6